How Extreme Weather Stresses The Grid

Europe experienced a week-long heatwave in mid-July. Just a week, scorching temperatures melted the Midwest and Deep South, eventually moving to the East Coast to smother states like New York and Massachusetts. But it wasn’t just tough on the people of those regions.

The sweltering heat is a massive strain on power grids, too. In winter, natural gas, heating oil, and other fuel sources supporting heating efforts and while the grid does see an increase in demand on frigid days, it’s often less pronounced than during summer months. That’s because when people need air conditioning, nearly everything draws on electricity. Bearing the brunt of the cooling needs of tens of millions of people, the grid sees massive, prolonged levels of demand that can last days or even weeks.

That demand can lead to outages, and when the lights go off and the air conditioning shuts d

own, those high temperatures can be dangerous. Cities across the Midwest offered public cooling spaces, water, even air-conditioned places to charge electronics to those whose homes had lost power.

It isn’t all load, either. The temperatures actually cause the grid to operate even less efficiently, with transmission lines physically swelling due to the heat and increased load. Studies show that extreme heat could cause a 1-5% decrease in efficiency over the next decade.

Tackling climate change and extreme weather patterns will take a lot of resources, innovation, and investment. There are lessons to be learned from states who’ve experienced similar heatwaves in the past, but energy grid experts are motivated to do more. See what other factors have caused energy companies to look to grid-scale energy storage solutions to make sure we can power the future.

Keeping Up With Energy Storage: Key Projects Around The World

Only recently, it was technological challenges that were holding back energy storage options. Now, it’s keeping up.

New systems and technologies have reshaped how energy storage is influencing the future of energy across the country and around the world. In every industry and at any scale, energy storage is emerging as a major priority. Over the past five years, batteries have improved in leaps and bounds, and the result has been a renewed interest and investment in everything from residential, industrial, even municipal grid systems tagging in batteries to aid their production efforts.

It’s worth taking a look at some of the biggest opportunities. In Australia, a gold mine has tagged in ESS as a part of its energy picture. The Genex Power project is utilizing wind, solar, and ESS to power a remote abandoned gold mine and turn it into the world’s first pumped hydro station. Using captured renewable energy and storage, the plan is to use the mine as a hydropower plant augmented with nearly 3 million solar panels. The total energy output is expected to be around 250 mWh for eight hours, with a start-up time of just 30 seconds.

Closer to home, Utah announced a 1,000-megawatt project to store renewable energy in the heart of the state. The project will rely on four different types of batteries, offering a neat glimpse at how different materials and systems offer unique advantages. They’ll use renewable hydrogen, compressed air energy storage, large-scale flow batteries, and solid oxide fuel cells in the project, with all renewable hydrogen batteries stored in five massive salt caverns that have already been earmarked.

Of course, most facilities face more familiar challenges, and they’ve addressed those challenges by adopted new technologies and some old tools, too. Peak power demands don’t just spike consumption; they also drive up rates to astronomic levels. Businesses like Channel Lumber have brought in ESS batteries to reduce their kilowatt rate by 20%, with an annual savings of over $50,000.

It’s a great time to look at your energy future. With an energy audit, we can determine what energy storage options work best for your business and help you take control of your energy environment for years to come.